Art / Cognitive Science / Computer Science / Creativity / Incompleteness / Neuroscience / Philosophy

Understanding in Hindsight

“Truth and reality in art begin at the point where the artist ceases to understand what he is doing and capable of doing …” Henri Matisse What Matisse is talking about here may be a general feature of creative processes. While they are going on, we don’t understand completely what we are doing. In the … Continue reading

Cosmopolitanism / Creativity / Culture / Ethics / History / Ideology / Incompleteness / Philosophy / Religion / Tribute

Living with Gaps And Cracks

Originally posted on The Asifoscope:
The basic and, in my opinion, defining property of the human mind is creativity: the ability to break out of any scheme, any fixed pattern or law of thinking. This results in our world to be “open”, in contrast to the closed, defined worlds of animals. We are able to…

Aesthetics / Cognitive Science / Computer Science / Creativity / Incompleteness / Neuroscience / Philosophy / Science

Formal Systems and Creative Systems

Each formal system, be it an algorithm, a formal theory made up of axioms and rules of inference, a formal grammar describing a set of strings of characters, or whatever kind of formalism, is a finite length text, so it contains only a finite amount of information. So even if a very large, infinite or … Continue reading

Cognitive Science / Computer Science / Creativity / Incompleteness / Neuroscience / Philosophy / Science

Explaining Creativity – A Roadmap

Originally posted on Creativistic Philosophy:
The distinctions made in my previous article seem to have left some of my readers perplexed because it is not quite clear what they are good for. Well, they are the first step of a line of thought that is difficult to put into a single blog article. Unlike scientific…

Civilization / Cognitive Science / Computer Science / Creativity / Culture / Incompleteness / Neuroscience / Philosophy / Science

Layers of Cognition

Originally posted on Creativistic Philosophy:
We might think of the world and ourselves as a layered system, like an onion. These layers have no fixed borders, they are just a way to orient ourselves in the matter, like a map, but looking at the matter this way might be useful. We may think of the…